Title

Beginning Teacher Perception of Campus and District Onboarding Practices in a Fast-Growth Texas School District

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D)

Department

Educational Administration

Date of Award

Fall 2020

Abstract

Texas House Bill 102, effective September 1, 2019, requires Texas public school districts to assign a mentor teacher to each beginning teacher; however, implementation may look different on each campus within a school district (H.B. 102, 2019). Campus principals can enhance district induction and mentoring programs through the onboarding of new teachers with such campus supports as professional learning communities and instructional rounds (Hannan, Russell, Takahashi, & Park, 2015). Onboarding practices are the assimilation of a new employee to the norms, expectations, values, mission, and vision of the organization (Graybill, Carpenter, Offord, Piorun, & Shaffer, 2013). The researcher explored beginning teachers’ perceptions of the campus and district onboarding practices they experienced in a fast-growth Texas school district. Research has shown that school district induction and mentoring programs have a positive influence on beginning teachers that results in increased job satisfaction, increased commitment to their job and the profession, and a higher retention rate when compared to beginning teachers who did not participate in an induction or mentoring program (Ingersoll & Strong, 2011; Sowell, 2017). While much research exists regarding the success of induction and mentoring programs for beginning teachers (Ingersoll & Strong, 2011; Sowell, 2017), research is limited in regards to beginning teachers’ perceptions of campus and district onboarding practices. Specific onboarding practices that beginning teachers described as beneficial and not beneficial at both the campus and district levels were explored. The participants completed a questionnaire in Qualtrics. The themes that emerged regarding district onboarding practices that the participants perceived as beneficial were (a) instructional rounds, (b) mentor teachers, and (c) professional learning. Three primary themes emerged as campus onboarding practices that the participants perceived as beneficial: (a) support, (b) professional learning, and (c) instructional rounds. Campus and district onboarding practices that the participants perceived as not beneficial were also explored in this study. Two themes emerged regarding district onboarding practices that the beginning teachers perceived as not beneficial: (a) time and (b) a lack of personalized professional learning. Two additional themes emerged in regard to campus onboarding practices that the beginning teachers perceived as not beneficial: (a) a lack of communication and (b) a need for more feedback.

Advisor

Melissa Arrambide

Subject Categories

Education | Educational Administration and Supervision

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