Title

An Examination of Effective Recruiting and Retention Practices for African American and Hispanic/Latino Faculty in Higher Education

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D)

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

Date of Award

Spring 2015

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to examine best practices for recruiting and retaining African American and Hispanic/Latino faculty in higher education. The researcher sought to determine effective strategies used by higher education institutions to recruit and retain African American and Hispanic/Latino faculty. The researcher aimed to identify recruiting and retention practices that African American and Hispanic/Latino faculty perceived to be most effective. Some higher education institutions have implemented plans and programs to support diversifying their faculty and staff to serve a diverse student body. However, more efforts are needed to address this matter to truly serve all students and influence the learning environment. The researcher applied grounded theory to form a framework for best practices in recruiting and retaining African American and Hispanic/Latino faculty in higher education. The method of procedure included interviews, observations, and documents to support best practices to recruit and retain African American and Hispanic/Latino faculty in higher education. The data yielded the following four overarching themes: (a) environment of institutions, (b) effective recruitment practices, (c) effective retention practices, and (d) perceptions of faculty diversity. The subtheme developed from the study was personal experiences of African American and Hispanic/Latino faculty. The data collected for the study revealed that minimal strategies were used to recruit and retain African American and Hispanic/Latino faculty. The data led to the development of the Statement of Institutional Diversity and Commitment, Environment, Diversity of Faculty and Organizational Culture framework (S.E.D.O.), which institutions of higher education can use to recruit and retain African American and Hispanic/Latino faculty effectively. The S.E.D.O. framework encompasses a statement of institutional diversity and commitment, based on the desired environment, diversity of faculty, and the organizational culture of higher education institutions. Overall, the findings are relevant for all higher education institutions that need diverse faculty members to serve diverse student bodies in preparation for a global workforce.

Advisor

Madeline Justice

Subject Categories

Curriculum and Instruction | Education | Higher Education

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