Title

Analysis of the Relationship Between Teachers' Self-Reported Classroom Technology Implementation Levels and High School Students' Academic Achievement

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D)

Department

Educational Administration

Date of Award

Spring 2015

Abstract

Educational technology has become a major financial and human capital investment for schools across the United States as educators search for innovative ways to engage today's students and increase academic achievement. Despite the mixed results of many research studies about technology's effect on academic achievement, schools are still purchasing digital tools at a record pace In 1999 the Texas Legislature introduced a yearly technology survey for teachers and librarian called the School Technology and Readiness Chart which measures perceived technology readiness and current levels of technology utilization in the classroom. During the same time frame, all Texas public high school students were taking federally mandated and state- developed exams called Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS). Students' scores on the English language arts (ELA) and math portions of the TAKS became the federal measure for academic achievement called Adequate Yearly Progress, required by No Child Left Behind (2002). This study compared data of teachers' STaR Chart self-assessment results and high schools' TAKS results over a 5-year time span between academic years 2006-2007 through 2010-2011. Regression statistics via Multilevel Modeling were used to examine the relationship between the self-reported daily activity of teachers' integrating technology into the classroom and students' academic achievement. The covariate factors of percent of students classified as economically disadvantaged, per pupil expenditures, percent of students classified as ethnic minority, and school size were considered to determine if they affected the variance between schools' TAKS outcomes. The sample for this study included 57 public high schools within Texas Region 7 Education Service. The Multilevel Modeling statistical analysis revealed that no relationship existed between the self-reported daily activity of teachers' integrating technology into the classroom and students' academic achievement, measured by TAKS scores, in the areas of English language arts, math, science, and social studies. The results also indicated that the study's covariate factors did not affect the variance between the self-reported daily activity of teachers' integrating technology into the classroom and students' academic achievement on TAKS. The results of this research indicated that factors other than those discussed in the literature review and measured in the study might account for variances in high schools' academic achievement as measured by TAKS results. The study findings also suggested that teachers' self-reported technology use was not a strong indicator of academic achievement levels for the 57 high schools in this study.

Advisor

Kriss Kemp-Graham

Subject Categories

Education | Educational Leadership | Educational Technology

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