Title

A Longitudinal Comparison of International Student Enrollments in 4-Year Institutions of Higher Education in the United States

Author

Cam Van Ngo

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D)

Department

Curriculum and Instruction

Date of Award

Spring 2014

Abstract

The purpose of this longitudinal, non-experimental quantitative research was to examine enrollments of international students by academic level at U.S. 4-year institutions of higher education. A longitudinal comparison was undertaken for international undergraduate and graduate enrollments for the 3 academic years of 2000/01, 2004/05, and 2010/11. The assessment was accomplished by determining whether there was any significant difference in international student enrollments by academic level at U.S. 4-year colleges and universities. The findings were used for combining with multiple resources concerning U.S. international higher education in order to draw out trends and patterns of international student mobility to the U.S. in the first decade of the 21st century. The target population of the study was international students studying at U.S. colleges and universities. Subjects of the study were gathered through the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Data Center. Data for the study were obtained from IPEDS based on the information reported from U.S. 4-year colleges and universities participating in the federal student financial aid programs. Descriptive, one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA), and mixed between- and within-subjects ANOVA were utilized to investigate the international student enrollments by academic level. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA examined the significant difference among international enrollments for the 3 academic years. A mixed between- and within-subjects ANOVA investigated the significant difference between undergraduate and graduate enrollments across the 3 academic years. Findings from the study showed that international student enrollments were increasing steadily in the first decade of the 21st century. The findings also indicated that overall pattern from the beginning until the end of the decade seemed that the U.S. received more international graduate students. However, the rise of international enrollments at the undergraduate level in the latter half of the decade was the trend of international student mobility to the U.S. in the first decade of the 21st century.

Advisor

Rick Lumadue

Subject Categories

Curriculum and Instruction | Education | Higher Education

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