Title

The Effect of Social Support on Perceived Stress, Self-Efficacy, and Burnout of Foster Parents

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (MS)

Department

Literature and Languages

Date of Award

Spring 2019

Abstract

Although foster parents go through a plethora of training, support for foster parents seems to be lacking in a way that leaves them to fend for themselves. Foster parents deal with an enormous amount of stress and quite often have no outlet, which impacts self-efficacy and burnout (Gil, 1984). I surveyed licensed foster parents to determine the impact of social support on perceived stress, perceived self-efficacy, and burnout. Using Pearson correlations, I did find a moderate relationship between perceived social support and perceived stress, as well as between perceived social support and perceived self-efficacy. I conducted an analysis of covariance and found that there was no significant relationship found between perceived social support and perceived burnout. In addition, there was no significant relationship between the covariate, self-efficacy, and burnout. However, greater levels of the covariate, perceived stress, was significantly related to higher levels of perceived burnout. As a result of the findings of this study, support should focus on the stress levels of foster parents.

Advisor

Jennifer L. Schroeder

Subject Categories

Psychology | Social and Behavioral Sciences

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