Publication Title

Aquatic Invasions

Document Type

Article

Abstract/Description

The life-history traits of a non-native population of Shimofuri goby (Tridentiger bifasciatus) were investigated in Nansi Lake, which is a storage lake on the East Route of the South-to-North Water Transfer Project, China. The results were analyzed in combination with data from other non-native populations of this species to reveal the life-history traits that caused its successful invasions. Mature gonads in April and May suggest that the species spawns in this period, and cohort tracking and age analysis revealed that individuals had a one-year lifespan. The relative fecundity was 2,825 ± 614 eggs/g. A short lifespan and high fecundity are opportunistic lifehistory traits that may enhance population establishment by promoting population increase. The male-biased sex ratio (except in April and May when the males guarding the nests) and sexual size dimorphism observed in this population may be important for males protecting nests and eggs, which is a typical equilibrium trait that facilitates establishment by increasing offspring survival. Non-native populations of this species in the San Francisco estuary system have been reported to batch spawn, have a lifespan of two years, and spawn during March and August, which in comparison with the population in Nansi Lake suggest that the species’ life-history traits are phenotypically plastic. We propose that the combined equilibrium and opportunistic characteristics of the species’ life-history traits and their plasticity facilitates successful invasions. Our results provide crucial information when evaluating the invasion risk of a species from its life-history traits.

Department

Biological and Environmental Sciences

First Page

514

Last Page

528

Volume

15

Issue

3

ISSN

1818-5487

Date

4-7-2020

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